The Earthly and the Unearthly: Poetry’s Imperative to Know

Poet Amy Pence considers if, as Rilke says, you have gone within yourself and discovered that you must write, what does that mean for how you live and write your life? Alongside her readers, she’ll consider how poetry helps us to interrogate both the known and the unknown, and how the practice of poetry can be more about an enriching discovery.

Contraction & Expansion in Poetry
Ilya Kaminsky in the Moment
I’ve always admired poet Ada Limón calling her poetry practice a “religion of noticing things.” In this linked interview, she talks about how invaluable…
In mid-October, when I arrived at the 5th floor apartment where my partner is staying in Prague, I hurried to the windows to see the dark clock towers…
Naomi Shihab Nye believes that existence itself is poetry. She says: “It always seemed very much to me, as a child …that my life was the poem. And in…
In my last entry, I explored how poems take us deeper into our own stories. Poems ground us in what we know, but also what we want to know. In the book…
The pandemic has loosened some screws, and I mean that in a good way. In addition to dissembling public life as we know it and drawing attention to…
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